Spring Has Sprung

3 weeks ago, our posting was that Spring was very tardy, a month in and no sign of green; not even leafbuds on the trees. Well now it is safe to announce that …

Green is in

Now I was going to put an exclamation point at the end of “Green is in”,  but inspection of the Humber River Valley shows that the green is still very light as seen in the following slide show:
 

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

The field trip slide at the start of the slideshow, demonstrates  that many of the trees in the Humber River Valley are just showing signs of leaf buds. Yes, all the Willows are fully blushing  yellow green. And the second slide shows that some of the Maples are well on the way towards full Summer glory. Certainly the recent rains have helped. But many Maples, Beech, Oaks, and even Aspen are only showing a tawdry pace in revealing their Summer Greens. 

We saw these same results in High Park where the big majestic Oaks and Maples are nearly leaf-bare. But in contrast the Spring Blooms are much more robust and as can be seen throughout the park.

Full Blooming Show in High Park

High Park’s Cherry blossoms are putting on a full blooming show. Yes, tulips, daffodils, and magnolia can be found tucked away in nooks and crannies; but the cherry blossoms have literally exploded in full Spring form:

{description/slide}.

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider
What is really remarkable is the number of cherry trees to be found in High Park. They start near the swimming pool and open soccer pitch but the bulk of the trees can be found on the slopes of the hills leading down to Grenadier pond. There must be  close to a  hundred trees dotting the hillside and adding bursts of white all along the pathways. The blending cherry blossom puffs of white against a yellow pastel willow backdrop or a stark pine green certainly attracted several thousand visitors this weekend.

But as can be seen from the slideshow the magnolias and forsythia  were also putting on a floral ritzy show as well. A welcome compensation for the late appearance of full covered Oak and Maple trees. In sum, this Spring suggests the full Nature of Climate Change as both flora and fauna adapt to the new weather cycles coming upon us all.

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *